Welcome to our Chinese medicine and acupuncture research news pages. We add to the content of these pages continuously as more research news comes in. Browse through the complete archive below or use the category links on the right.

Please note that the most twenty recent research archive items are free to view but access to the thousands of items in the archive require a journal subscription.


Practising tai chi can lead to a reduction in levels of inflammatory markers in the blood of older adults.

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Tai chi has a better impact on preventing falls in the elderly than conventional physiotherapy, perhaps because it leads to an increased sense of self-efficacy in practitioners.

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The addition of tai chi to endurance training (ET) leads to improved exercise tolerance and quality of life (QOL) in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), according to an Italian study.

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The first pragmatic randomised controlled trial of tai chi for people with low back pain has shown that it can improve pain and disability outcomes in this population.

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In a four-year study of 195 subjects with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease, tai chi has been found to improve postural stability and walking ability and to reduce the risk of falling.

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Physiological responses normally associated with involuntary autonomic thermoregulation can be voluntarily activated during a tai chi exercise.

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Tai chi can help prevent weight gain and maintain lean body mass in breast cancer survivors by stabilising insulin levels, say American researchers.

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Practising tai chi can lead to a reduction in levels of inflammatory markers in the blood of older adults.

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A US pilot study suggests that tai chi may be able to help cancer patients with cognitive problems that can arise as a side effect of chemotherapy treatment.

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Taking part in a 12-week tai chi programme has multiple health benefits for post-menopausal women, particularly for those suffering from age-related loss of muscle strength.

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