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Research Archive

Welcome to our Chinese medicine and acupuncture research news pages. We add to the content of these pages continuously as more research news comes in. Browse through the complete archive below or use the category links on the right.

Please note that the most twenty recent research archive items are free to view but access to the thousands of items in the archive require a journal subscription.

A meta-analysis from Sweden has evaluated the association between long-term use of mobile phones and the risk of brain tumours. Based on ten studies on glioma and nine studies on acoustic neuroma, they concluded that long term (10+ years) use of mobi

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Babies delivered by Caesarean section have a 20% higher risk than those delivered normally of developing type 1 diabetes. A meta-analysis by Northern Irish researchers examined 20 published observational studies from 16 countries including around 10,

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Consumption of caffeine during pregnancy may increase the risk of foetal growth restriction, according to the results of a large, prospective observational study carried out in the UK. 2635 low risk pregnant women were recruited between 8-12 weeks of

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People who live near green spaces are healthier. British researchers classified the entire pre-retirement population of England (n=40 813 236) into groups on the basis of income deprivation and exposure to green space. They concluded that populations

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Loss of sleep, even for a single night, can trigger the body’s inflammatory response, increasing the risk of heart disease and autoimmune disorders. American researchers measured levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, a transcription factor mediating i

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Listening to enjoyable music may be good for cardiovascular health, a US study suggests. To determine the effect of music on endothelial function, researchers conducted a four-phase randomised crossover study on ten healthy nonsmokers, mean age 36

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An American randomised controlled trial has compared the lipid-lowering effects of lifestyle changes plus dietary supplements with a standard dose of a statin drug. The study enrolled 74 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and randomised them to an a

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Drinking chlorinated water while pregnant can harm the foetus. A cross-sectional study of nearly 400,000 infants in Taiwan examined the risk of developing eleven common birth defects at four levels of exposure to chlorination by-products. The results

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Men and women in happy marriages have lower blood pressure than single people. An American study looked at ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) over a 24 hour period in 204 married and 99 single males and females. High marital quality was associated with

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Prolonged, unabated grief, known as complicated grief, activates neurones in the brain’s reward centres, possibly giving memories of lost loved ones addictive qualities. US researchers looked at 23 women who had lost a mother or sister to breast ca

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Taking part in just 20 minutes of any physical activity per week is enough to improve mental health. Researchers interviewed 19,842 Scottish men and women about their state of mind and weekly physical activity. Doing any form of daily physical activi

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Men who exercise often are less likely to die from cancer than those who don't exercise. A cohort of 40,708 Swedish men aged 45-79 was followed for six years. Men who walked or cycled for at least 30 minutes a day had a 33% reduction in cancer mortal

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Physically active women are less likely to get breast cancer. A review of all published literature to September 2007 was conducted using online databases; 34 case-control and 28 cohort studies were included. Evidence for a risk reduction associated w

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Adverse experiences in childhood increase the risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes in adulthood. 9310 members of the 1958 British birth cohort took part in a biomedical interview at 45 years of age. Several adversities in childhood were ass

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Women who breastfeed for longer have a decreased chance of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Researchers compared 136 women with rheumatoid arthritis with 544 women of a similar age. They found that those who had breast fed for longer were muc

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Breastfeeding during the first months of life appears to raise a child's verbal IQ, according to a study of nearly 13,889 children carried out in Belarus. Six-year-olds whose mothers had been part of an education program that encouraged them to breas

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Swedish investigators have found the death rate amongst golfers is 40% lower than for other people of the same sex, age and socioeconomic status, which equates to an increased life expectancy of five years. The cohort study included 300,818 golfers.

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Viewing a stressful soccer match more than doubles the risk of an acute cardiovascular event.  A German study carried out during the 2006 World Cup, which was hosted by Germany, found that there were significant increases in cardiac emergencies

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Chronic anxiety can significantly increase the risk of a heart attack for men. Californian scientists used a cohort study involving 735 men (mean age 60). Each of the men completed psychological testing and was in good cardiovascular health at baseli

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Healthy lifestyle behaviors during the early elderly years are associated not only with enhanced life span in men but also with good health and function during older age. In a prospective cohort study of 2357 healthy men, mean age 72 at baseline, Ame

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Even if you are over 65, improving your diet and lifestyle can still lead to significant health benefits and decrease your chances of developing chronic diseases. A literature review by a US author has found that adhering to a low-calorie, low-fat

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Individuals who are physically active are biologically younger than those with sedentary lifestyles. British investigators surveyed 2401 twin volunteers using questionnaires on physical activity level, smoking status, and socioeconomic status. The re

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Combining four healthy lifestyle habits can add as much as 14 years on to your lifespan. UK researchers examined the relationship between lifestyle and mortality in a cohort of 20,000 people aged 45-79, with no known cardiovascular disease or cancer

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People who start drinking alcohol in later life immediately decrease their risk of developing cardiovascular disease. A US study examined a cohort of 7697 adults aged 45-64 years, who had no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline, over a 10-ye

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The biggest risk for a midlife crisis is not divorce, ill health or losing one's job, it’s merely the act of aging itself. Researchers from Great Britain and the USA analysed data spanning more than 35 years, 2 million people and 80 countrie

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Breast size in early adulthood may predict women’s risk of developing diabetes later in life. Canadian researchers carried out a secondary analysis of data collected from a cohort study of 92,000 women, mean age 38 at baseline, which began in 1989.

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Babies with only a limited variety of bacteria in their faeces one week after birth are more likely to develop atopy as infants. Swedish researchers collected faecal samples collected from 35 infants at one week of age and used molecular techniques t

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Analysis of data from a landmark public health study suggests that people who had a low birth weight are more likely to experience depression and anxiety later in life. Canadian researchers used information from the Medical Research Council’s Natio

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Babies delivered by elective caesarean section before term carry up to a fourfold increased risk of breathing problems, compared with babies delivered vaginally or by emergency caesarean section. Researchers in Denmark investigated the association be

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Professional and high-income households are the heaviest drinkers, according to figures from the UK’s Office for National Statistics (ONS). On average, British men drank 18.7 units of alcohol weekly during 2006 compared with nine units for women. T

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Extroverts tend to be overweight, while anxious types are more likely to be thin. Japanese researchers surveyed more than 30,000 people aged between 40 and 64 about their height and weight, and subjected them a personality test. The results showed th

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Experiments in which students were given small amounts of cash windfalls with instructions on how to spend it, showed that those who gave the money away (donating to charity or giving a gift) were happier at the end of the day than those who blew it

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Italian researchers compared 105 patients suffering from migraine without aura with a control group of 79 healthy subjects using psychometric questionnaires. Migraine patients were found to show more depressive symptoms, more difficulty with anger ma

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A study from California has examined the influence of childhood sun exposure on the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) in monozygotic twins. Seventy-nine twin pairs were identified where there was a quantifiable difference in sun exposure between the pa

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Lonely people are prone to illness and early death because their immune system genes are dysregulated. An American study analysed gene transcription activity in people who chronically experienced high versus low levels of subjective social isolation

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Anger and stress in middle-aged men and women are associated with developing high blood pressure and coronary heart disease (CHD). Investigators analysed data from an American cohort study of 15,792 subjects aged 45-64 at enrolment. Participants were

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A prospective cohort study of 9,011 British civil servants assessed negative aspects of close relationships, such as not confiding and not getting emotional support, using a questionnaire. Associations between negative aspects of relationships, and c

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The results of a prospective observational study of 6005 UK adults over 50 suggest that moderate drinking is associated with better mental health than abstinence. For both men and women, better cognition and subjective well-being, and fewer depressiv

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The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the cancer arm of the World Health Organisation, has reclassified overnight shift work as a probable carcinogen. Epidemiological studies on nurses and flight crews have previously linked nigh

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The American Institute for Cancer Research and World Cancer Research Fund have issued a comprehensive report detailing the links between cancer and various dietary and lifestyle factors. The report lists ten recommendations for those who want to redu

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Longer breastfeeding in infancy is associated with improved lung function in later childhood, as long as the mother does not have asthma. American researchers followed 679 children from birth to adolescence and evaluated their lung function between t

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Researchers in the USA measured foetal responses to a guided meditation designed to induce maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy. The 18-minute guided imagery intervention generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin con

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Drinking during pregnancy has adverse behavioural consequences for the offspring. A longitudinal study questioned 4,912 mothers about their drinking habits while pregnant and assessed 8,621 of their offspring for behavioural problems between the a

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Smoking during pregnancy adversely affects the reproductive systems of male foetuses, according to Scottish scientists. Their study looked at the expression of genes in male foetal tissue (testes, blood and liver), comparing pregnancies of mothers wh

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Researchers from the National Institutes of Health in the US have found that men with increased body mass index (BMI) are significantly more likely to be infertile than normal-weight men. The study of more than 25,000 couples found that men classed a

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A 10-year study comparing organic tomatoes with conventionally grown ones suggests that they may be healthier, confirming pro-organic opinion. Levels of the antioxidant flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, which have been linked to reduced rates of c

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Regular eating of small amounts of dark chocolate may help lower blood pressure. In a German study, 44 volunteers with mildly raised blood pressure ate just over six grams of dark chocolate (one square from German chocolate bar Ritter Sport) or the s

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A study by Danish researchers has found that intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) significantly decreases the level of testosterone in male children conceived using the assisted reproductive technique. The study examined over a thousand male babie

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Researchers at Duke University think they have finally found out what the human appendix is for. It may act as a ‘safe house’ for beneficial gut bacteria, facilitating recolonisation of the intestines in the event of a catastrophic pathogen ev

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Men who encounter fair-haired women have their own ‘blonde moment’. Scientists found that men’s scores in general knowledge tests fell after they were shown photos of blondes. The French researchers believe that the men’s mental performanc

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Women can significantly cut their risk of having a heart attack by eating healthily, drinking moderately, staying physically active, maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking. A prospective Swedish cohort study followed over 24,000 postmenopausal

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